Indonesians in Poland – who are they? - English version - Worksol
Indonesians in Poland - who are they?

Indonesians in Poland – who are they?

13 October 2022

Who are Indonesians in Poland? They are the people who have come to Poland from Indonesia, a Southeast Asian country located between the Indian and Pacific oceans. There is no one answer to this question, as there is no one type of Indonesian in Poland. Some Indonesians in Poland are students, some are workers, and others are businesspeople.

However, all Indonesians in Poland share a common experience: they are living in a country that is not their own. This blog post will explore the experiences of Indonesians in Poland. We will hear more what it is like to be Indonesian in Poland. We will learn about the challenges and the triumphs of living in a country that is not your own.

What are the demographics of Indonesians in Poland?

There are several thousand Indonesians living in Poland, most of whom are students or workers. The majority of Indonesians in Poland are from the cities of Jakarta and Bandung.

Indonesians in Poland tend to be highly educated, with many holding degrees from Polish universities. They are typically fluent in both Indonesian and Polish, and often work in fields such as finance, academia, and diplomacy.

Another part of Indonesians living in Poland are employees who came to work in Poland using the services of employment agencies that help Polish employers find workers from Asia.

The Indonesian community in Poland is relatively small but close-knit. There are several Indonesian student associations active in Warsaw and other major cities, and many Indonesians also participate in the larger Asian community in Poland.

Where did they come from and why?

Indonesians in Poland are a relatively new phenomenon. The first Indonesians came to Poland in the 1970s as students or workers. There were only a few hundred of them at that time. Now, there are several thousand Indonesians living in Poland, most of them in Warsaw and other big cities.

The vast majority of Indonesians in Poland are Muslim. They come from various parts of Indonesia, such as Java, Sumatra, Kalimantan, and Sulawesi. Many of them have Polish spouses or partners.

There are several reasons why Indonesians choose to live in Poland. For some, it is an opportunity to study or work in a developed country. For others, it is a chance to be reunited with family members who have already settled here. And for many, it is simply a matter of personal preference – they simply enjoy living in Poland and find it to be a comfortable place to call home.

What are the biggest challenges they face?

The biggest challenge that Indonesians in Poland face is the language barrier. Many of them are not able to speak Polish fluently, which makes it difficult for them to communicate with locals and navigate daily life. Additionally, they may face discrimination or isolation from the local community.

What contribution do they make to Polish society?

Indonesians in Poland contribute to Polish society in many ways. They are active in the business community, they help to promote cultural understanding between Poles and Indonesians, and they are also involved in charitable work.

Indonesians who have made Poland their home bring with them a wealth of experience and expertise. Many are successful businessmen and businesswomen, adding to the vibrancy of the Polish economy. Others work in various professions, such as medicine, education, and the arts. Their skills and knowledge enrich Polish society and help to make it more cosmopolitan.

Indonesians also play an important role in promoting cultural understanding between Poles and Indonesians. Through their everyday interactions with Poles, they help to dispel stereotypes and misconceptions about each other’s cultures. They also organise events and activities that showcase the best of Indonesian culture, such as festivals, concerts, and exhibitions. By doing so, they create opportunities for Poles to learn about and appreciate Indonesian culture.

Finally, Indonesians in Poland are also involved in charitable work. They often support charities that help Indonesian people back home, such as those that provide medical care or education. But they also help Polish charities that are working to improve the lives of disadvantaged people in Poland. Their donations of time and money make a real difference to the lives of those who benefit from them.

How well integrated are they?

There are an estimated 10,000+ Indonesians living in Poland, most of whom are concentrated in the capital city of Warsaw. While there is no official data on the size or composition of the Indonesian community in Poland, a 2011 study by the Polish-Indonesian Society found that Indonesians made up the third-largest group of Asians living in Warsaw at that time.

Despite this, there are several active Indonesian community groups and organisations in Poland that help to promote Indonesian culture and foster social cohesion among its members. The most prominent of these is the Polish-Indonesian Society, which was founded in 1960 and organises various events and activities throughout the year. Other groups include the Association of Indonesian Students and Alumni in Poland (PERPI) and IndonesiaKomunitasWarszawa, an online forum for Indonesians living in Warsaw.

Conclusion

It is estimated that there are more than 10,000 Indonesians living in Poland. Most of them came to study, but some have also found work here. They usually live in big cities like Warsaw or Krakow. Indonesians in Poland generally enjoy a good standard of living and are well integrated into society.

However, they still face some challenges, such as discrimination and limited job opportunities. With the last one can help WORKSOL Group, offering Indonesians great job offers in different parts of Poland and in different fields of economy. Overall, Indonesians in Poland are doing well and contributing positively to society. With more understanding and acceptance from the wider community, they will be able to fully realize their potential in this country.

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